1. Slideshow

    In an earlier post I discussed the book I have produced on my year-long project – One. To accompany it I’ve made an audio-visual slideshow. Although time-consuming I have to say I really enjoy putting such sequences together. Standalone images are all well and good but don’t compare, in my opinion, to seeing photographs blending into one another against a backdrop of appropriate music. I hope you enjoy it, and for a little under seven minutes are transported to my little wood, in north Kent.

    Leave a Comment
  2. Twilight

    The Twilight project (for now at least) has come to an end as I now have other projects I wish to concentrate on. Its been one of the most challenging projects I have done to date from both a technical and artistic standpoint and, as a result, has been all the more enjoyable and worthwhile.

    Rather than post all the images singularly and having seen the effectiveness of Niall Benvie’s Panels and the work of Matthew Chase-Daniel, I have decided to produce a panel of my own which, I feel, gives a cohesion to the series.

    So why did I choose to undertake the project in the first place? Like many others, I’m forever striving to improve my photography and try out different techniques in the hope of producing something fresh and original, to draw the viewer in and look more closely as opposed to merely moving from one image to another. From what I could see, few images had been created during this period and that was all the motivation I needed! It, also, wasn’t weather dependent and subject matter lay all around and so if I’d spent the day at home processing images I could still pop out for a couple of hours to a nearby woodland and look for subjects there, thereby ensuring I remain productive.

    Ultimately, I want people to appreciate and care about our immediate environment and for photographers not to think you have to travel to far flung destinations to obtain rewarding images. My ethos has always been to work close to home and this project is a testament to that where all were taken less than 5 miles from where I live.

    Click on the image to see the panel in its entirety.

    twilight

    Leave a Comment
  3. In the twilight hour

    Twilight is defined as being the period between daybreak and sunrise and between sunset and night. To be more exact, when the sun falls below 18 degrees you enter nightfall and when the sun rises to 18 degrees below the horizon, you enter daybreak or dawn. As for how long this lasts, depends on your location and, also, climatic conditions. In general, however, it does so for, approximately, 1 hour.

    Since most of us (I am assuming here) consider twilight to take place after sunset and not before sunrise, my aim for, around, one month, was to photograph plants during this period. I would head out an hour before sunset to seek out the image and begin shooting as the sun slipped below the horizon. Often I would go out with a specific image in mind, as the case with Bluebells and Grasses but on other occasions I would, simply, see what I could find. I, quickly, learned that no matter how interesting an image looked through the viewfinder as sunset approached, it’s appearance would change, rapidly, as the light faded. Warm tones would turn blue, gaps through trees would emerge revealing an aperture in which to place the subject and intricate details on flowers would slowly disappear to, eventually, form a silhouette.

    I thoroughly enjoyed producing this series of images. It focused me, intensely, and opened my eyes (and imagination) to new possibilities and, although, many more were taken, some, I felt, just didn’t work for one reason or another. I have a feeling this project will run and run!

    Wood anemone

    Wood anemone

    Wild cherry

    Wild cherry

    Wood spurge

    Wood spurge

    Notes on the photography: I’ve, purposefully, steered clear of adding technical details to each image as I don’t want to detract from the visual. F-stops, shutter speeds and iso’s, though important, are secondary to “seeing” the subject and how you, as the photographer, interpret it. But, in order to satisfy curiosity, I used a Nikon D300 and for all, a 200mm f4 Micro.

    Blackthorn

    Blackthorn

    Elder

    Elder

    Hawthorn

    Hawthorn

    ramson-1

    Wild garlic

    catkins

    Oak catkins

    Bluebells

    Bluebells

    Grasses

    Grasses

     

    1 Comment

Be among the first to hear of new workshops and tours

Search Blog

Blog Archive

December 2018
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31